Civil War Library

Original Union and Confederate Books, Manuscripts and Photographs

Updated February 11, 2018

United States Abolitionist and Anti-Slavery Organizations


This is a partial list of abolitionist and anti-slavery organizations that existed from pre-Revolutionary War America through the end of the American Civil War.  Also included are political organizations and parties that were opposed to slavery.  We have also listed religious organizations or denominations that opposed slavery.

This is an initial attempt to compile a list of all of the abolitionist and anti-slavery organizations that existed.  Some sources claim that there were more than 500 such organizations on record.  This list includes 177 organizations, political parties, and religious groups that were opposed to slavery.

Our search of primary and secondary sources has found no extant list.

We have included the leadership, including the founding members and officers, of these organizations whenever possible.

We have included a partial group of references and page numbers for these organizations and individuals.

A number of these organizations changed their names or morphed into different organizations at various times.  We have tried to cross-reference this information.

We would invite readers to submit names of organizations, with references, for inclusion in this database.

This list was last updated in June 2013.


 

Abolitionist Party, see Liberty Party

 

 

African Methodist Episcopal (AME) Church, founded April 1816, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.  Originally comprised of 16 African American congregations that banded together.  Emphasized education of Blacks.  Anti-slavery, abolitionist group.  Served as a station of the Underground Railroad.  (Allen, 1983; Basker, 2005, pp. 276, 277, 278, 283-284, 294-295; Dodson, 2002; George, 1973; Mabee, 1970; Payne, 1891; Rodriguez, 2007, pp. 18, 33-34, 155-159, 207)

 

Richard Allen, 1760-1830, first pastor (bishop), former slave (Allen, 1983)

 

Absalom Jones, free Black, 1737-1818

 

 

Alexandria Society for Promoting the Abolition of Slavery (Locke, 1901, pp. 101, 107, 110)

 

 

American Abolition Society, newspaper: Radical Abolitionist, William Goodell, editor (Filler, 1960, pp. 142, 249, 261; Radical Abolitionist, Vol. 1, 1855)

 

Officers:

 

Gerrit Smith, New York, President

 

Lewis Tappan, New York, Vice President

 

Samuel McFarland, Pennsylvania, Vice President

 

A. B. Burdick, Rhode Island, Vice President

 

J. W. North, Minnesota, Vice President

 

Arthur Tappan, New York, Treasurer

 

William Goodell, New York, Corresponding Secretary

 

James McCune Smith, New York City, Executive Committee

 

S. S. Jocelyn, New York City, Executive Committee

 

I. R. Barbour, New York City, Executive Committee

 

George Whipple, New York City, Executive Committee

 

Dr. Thomas Ritter, New York City, Executive Committee

 

Samuel Wilde, Kings Co., New York, Illinois, Executive Committee

 

D. Sharpe, Executive Committee

 

Frederick Douglass, Rochester, New York, Executive Committee

 

Elnathan Davis, Fitchburg, Massachusetts, Executive Committee

 

Abram Pryne, Syracuse, New York, Executive Committee

 

Isaac T. Hutchins, Connecticut, Executive Committee

 

Members:

 

A. B. Burdick, Rhode Island

 

Charles G. Case, New York

 

George W. Clark, New York

 

Frederick Douglass, New York

 

Amos Dresser, Ohio

 

C. C. Foote, Michigan

 

Robert Furman, New York

 

William Goodell, New York

 

J. C. Harrington, New York

 

Timothy B. Hudson, Ohio

 

J. W. Loguen, New York

 

Samuel McFarland, Pennsylvania

 

Lucius C. Matlack, New York

 

Samuel J. May

 

J. W. North, Minnesota

 

Abram Pryne, New York

 

Gerrit Smith, New York

 

James McCune Smith, New York

 

Charles Stuart

 

Arthur Tappan, New York

 

Lewis Tappan, New York

 

John Thomas, New York

 

Melauethon B. Williams

 

 

American Anti-Slavery Society (AASS), founded in New York City, December 1833, disbanded 1870; published The Emancipator and The Anti-Slavery Standard; had 1,350 affiliated societies and 250,000 members in 1838.  By 1840, there were 2,000 affiliated societies.  The Anti-Slavery Society was part of a larger evangelical revival of the period, which felt that slavery was a sin and that slave-holders were sinners.  It had agents that traveled throughout the country producing lectures, distributing anti-slavery journals, and organized local anti-slavery societies.  It petitioned Congress to end slavery immediately in the District of Columbia and in any Federal territories.  There was much opposition to the Anti-Slavery Society in the North, especially with business owners, who depended on imports from the slave states.  Ultimately, the American Anti-Slavery Society demanded immediate emancipation from the government.  Largest and most influential abolitionist organization in the United States.  Believed that slavery must be “immediately abandoned.”  Lobbied Congress to end slavery. 

(Barnes, 1933; Blue, 2005, pp. 17, 20-21, 31, 42-43, 45, 48-49, 61, 94; Bracy, 1971; Drake, 1950, pp. 162, 140-147, 153-155, 179-180; Dumond, 1961, pp. 175, 177-182, 185, 259-260, 267, 268, 271, 272, 284-285, 295; Filler, 1960, pp. 66, 72, 97, 129; Friedman, 1982; Mabee, 1970, pp. 2, 4, 22026, 31, 33, 37, 38, 40, 57, 69, 72, 88, 131, 151, 187, 189, 215, 235, 245, 247, 249, 265, 277, 293, 322, 324, 338, 359, 387; Mitchell, 2007, pp. 1, 4-7, 12-14, 16-17, 19, 223, 237, 242-244; Harrold, 1995, pp. 6, 54, 55, 59, 61, 85; Perry, 1995; Rodriguez, 2007, pp. 42, 53, 105, 106, 152, 161-162, 189, 288, 290-291, 305-306, 308-309, 321-322, 344, 363, 346, 453, 522; Sernett, 2002; Sorin, 1971, pp. xii, 31, 51, 59, 65, 73n, 74, 75, 79, 87, 93, 95; Yellin, 1994, pp. 6-7, 18, 27, 31-32, 39, 43, 76, 79, 159, 133, 161-162, 174-176, 190, 235, 244, 250, 273, 288-289, 323, 325-326)

 

William Lloyd Garrison, co-founder, leader, radical abolitionist (Dumond, 1961; Harrold, 1995; Mabee, 1970; Mitchell, 2007; Sorin, 1971; Van Broeken, 2002)

 

Theodore Dwight Weld, co-founder (Dumond, 1961, pp. 175-182; Harrold, 1995; Mabee, 1970; Sorin, 1971, pp. 60, 67, 70n, 97)

 

Arthur Tappan, co-founder (Dumond, 1961; Mabee, 1970; Mitchell, 2007, pp. 1, 4, 7, 8, 13-14, 16-17; Sorin, 1971, pp. 71n, 73, 75, 114)

 

Lewis Tappan, co-founder (Dumond, 1961, pp. 175-182; Harrold, 1995; Mabee, 1970; Mitchell, 2007, pp. 4, 5, 8, 13-17, 30, 36, 46-48, 71; Sorin, 1971, pp. 70-77, 93, 96, 102, 113, 114, 131)

 

James G. Baradoes (free Black), b. 1810, Boston, Board of Managers

 

James G. Birney, Cincinnati, lawyer, publisher of The Philanthropist, former slaveholder (Dumond, 1961, pp. 176-182; Harrold, 1995; Mabee, 1970; Mitchell, 2007; Sorin, 1971, pp. 25, 51, 52, 65, 70n, 103n; Van Broeken, 2002)

 

George Bourne (Dumond, 1961, pp. 175-182)

 

Henry Bowen, agent (Sernett, 2002, p. 43)

 

Charles W. Dennison, editor of Emancipator (Dumond, 1961, p. 180)

 

Reverend William Goodell, editor of Genius of Temperance, editor of Emancipator (Dumond, 1961, pp. 175-182; Blue, 2005, pp. 19, 20, 23, 25, 32, 34, 50, 53, 54, 101; Harrold, 1995; Mabee, 1970; Mitchell, 2007, pp. 1, 7, 22, 29, 31, 35, 46, 63, 64, 71, 72, 162-163, 199, 225; Rodriguez, 2007; Sorin, 1971, pp. 25, 57-62, 113-114, 126, 130)

 

Beriah Green, agent (Blue, 2005, pp. 17, 34-35; Dumond, 1961, p. 180; Harrold, 1995; Mabee, 1970; Sorin, 1971, pp. 25, 60, 90, 96, 97, 130)

 

Angelina Moore Grimké, women’s rights advocate (Mabee, 1970; Van Broeken, 2002; Yellin, 1994)

 

Sarah Moore Grimké, women’s rights advocate (Mabee, 1970; Van Broeken, 2002; Yellin, 1994)

 

William Jay (Blue, 2005, pp. 19, 20, 21; Dumond, 1961; Harrold, 1995; Mabee, 1970; Sorin, 1971, pp. 51, 77-81, 96, 132)

 

Simon Jocelyn, New Haven (Dumond, 1961, pp. 175-182; Harrold, 1995; Mabee, 1970)

 

Abbey Kelley, women’s rights advocate (Mabee, 1970; Van Broeken, 2002; Yellin, 1994)

 

Joshua Leavitt, preacher, lawyer, editor of Evangelist and Emancipator (Blue, 2005, pp. 20, 25, 34, 45, 50, 54, 94, 119, 122; Dumond, 1961, pp. 175-182; Harrold, 1995; Mabee, 1970; Mitchell, 2007, pp. 1, 7-8, 17, 20, 28, 29, 35, 45-47, 167, 217; Sorin, 1971, pp. 51, 68-71, 96, 131-132)

 

Elijah Lovejoy, Alton, Illinois, anti-slavery publisher, killed by a pro-slavery mob in Alton, Illinois (Blue, 2005, pp. 6, 20, 90-96, 105, 269; Dumond, 1961; Mabee, 1970; Rodriguez, 2007; Sorin, 1971, p. 60)

 

Samuel J. May, Brooklyn, Connecticut, Unitarian minister, agent (Dumond, 1961, pp. 180, 182; Mabee, 1970)

 

James McCrummel (free Black), Board of Managers

 

Calvin Pepper, agent (Dumond, 1961, p. 180)

 

Amos A. Phelps, agent (Dumond, 1961, p. 179; Harrold, 1995)

 

Wendell Phillips (Dumond, 1961; Harrold, 1995; Mabee, 1970; Van Broeken, 2002)

 

Ray Potter, Pawtucket, Rhode Island, Baptist minister, lecturer, member Rhode Island Anti-Slavery Society (Dumond, 1961, p. 182)

 

Achilles Pugh, Society of Friends, Quaker, newspaper printer

 

Robert Purvis (free Black), vice president, Board of Managers (Mabee, 1970)

 

Charles Stuart Renshaw, agent (Dumond, 1961, p. 182; Sernett, 2002, p. 43)

 

Henry B. Stanton, public relations, finance, executive committee, agent, husband of Elizabeth Cady Stanton (Sernett, 2002, pp. 43-44; Van Broeken, 2002)

 

George Storrs, agent (Sernett, 2002, p. 43)

 

George Thompson, agent (Dumond, 1961, p. 182; Harrold, 1995; Mabee, 1970; Van Broeken, 2002)

 

John Greenleaf Whittier, author, poet, journalist, radical abolitionist (Blue, 2005, pp. 5, 37-47, 49-50, 52-53, 63, 248-249, 259, 264; Dumond, 1961, p. 179; Harrold, 1995; Mabee, 1970; Mitchell, 2007, pp. 12, 54, 58, 162, 230, 243)

 

Thomas Williams, agent (Dumond, 1961, p. 180)

 

Elizur Wright, Jr., corresponding secretary, professor of mathematics and natural philosophy, Western Reserve College (Dumond, 1961, pp. 177-182; Harrold, 1995; Mabee, 1970)

 

 

American Anti-Slavery Society of New York, founded 1834

 

 

American Colonization Society (ACS), founded December 28, 1816, in U.S. House of Representatives, Washington, DC.  (Drake, 1950, pp. 124-126, 131; Dumond, 1961, pp. 127-129, 176; Filler, 1960, pp. 20, 61, 225; Freehling, 1994; Hammond, 2011, pp. 168, 219, 252, 269, 271, 273, 274, 283; Harrold, 1995, pp. 6, 18-19, 29, 34, 132; Miller, 1975; Mitchell, 2007, pp. 4-5; Rodriguez, 2007, pp. 20, 34, 41, 104-105, 129, 163-164, 290, 308, 319, 521, 586-587; Sernett, 2002; Sorin, 1971; Staudenraus, 1961)

 

Henry Clay, 1777-1852, president of ACS from 1836-1852 (Blue, 2005, pp. 11, 24, 27, 29, 47, 50-51, 55, 123-124, 166-167)

 

William Lloyd Garrison (Blue, 2005; Dumond, 1961; Filler, 1960; Harrold, 1995; Mabee, 1970; Mitchell, 2007; Rodriguez, 2007; Sorin, 1971)

 

Arthur Tappan (Blue, 2005; Dumond, 1961; Filler, 1960; Harrold, 1995; Mabee, 1970; Mitchell, 2007; Rodriguez, 2007; Sorin, 1971)

 

Lewis Tappan (Blue, 2005; Dumond, 1961; Filler, 1960; Harrold, 1995; Mabee, 1970; Mitchell, 2007; Rodriguez, 2007; Sorin, 1971)

 

James G. Birney (Blue, 2005; Dumond, 1961; Filler, 1960; Harrold, 1995; Mabee, 1970; Mitchell, 2007; Rodriguez, 2007; Sorin, 1971)

 

Gerrit Smith (Blue, 2005; Dumond, 1961; Filler, 1960; Harrold, 1995; Mabee, 1970; Mitchell, 2007; Rodriguez, 2007; Sernett, 2002; Sorin, 1971)

 

 

American Convention of Abolition Societies.  Met biennially, or more often, as necessary.  (Filler, 1960, p. 26; Rodriguez, 2007, pp. 29, 34, 105)

 

Evan Lewis, Wilmington, Society of Friends, Quaker, vice president (1823)

 

Thomas Shipley, Philadelphia, Society of Friends, Quaker, secretary (1823)

 

Abraham Pennock, Philadelphia, Society of Friends, Quaker, treasurer (1823)

 

Benjamin Lundy, Philadelphia, Society of Friends, Quaker (Harrold, 1995)

 

 

American and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society (A&FASS), founded 1840.  (Filler, 1960, pp. 136, 261; Harrold, 1995, pp. 7, 32, 87, 89, 91, 96, 104, 140-141, 144, 157; Mabee, 1970, pp. 4, 26, 56, 104, 106, 139, 156, 187, 203, 233, 246, 253, 255, 259, 274, 297, 307; Mitchell, 2007, pp. 16-17, 223, 237; Rodriguez, 2007, pp. 46, 50, 179, 185, 308, 362, 398; Sorin, 1971, p. 131)

 

Arthur Tappan, president (Harrold, 1995; Mabee, 1970; Mitchell, 2007, pp. 1, 4, 7, 8, 13-14, 16-17; Sorin, 1971, pp. 73, 75, 102, 114)

 

Lewis Tappan (Harrold, 1995; Mabee, 1970; Mitchell, 2007, pp. 4, 5, 8, 13-14, 16-17, 28-30, 35, 46-58, 71; Sorin, 1971, pp. 70-77, 93, 96, 102, 113, 114, 131)

 

Henry B. Stanton (Mitchell, 2007, pp. 4, 5, 7, 8, 12, 14, 15, 16, 18, 28, 36, 45, 47, 101, 162, 223)

 

 

American Free Produce Association, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, founded during the Requited Labor Convention at Pennsylvania Hall in 1838 by the Society of Friends, Quakers.  Founded to encourage Quakers and non-Quakers to refrain from purchasing gods produced by slave labor.  (Drake, 1950; Filler, 1960)

 

Gerrit Smith (Harrold, 1995; Mabee, 1970; Sernett, 2002; Sorin, 1971)

 

Lewis Tappan (Harrold, 1995; Mabee, 1970; Sorin, 1971, pp. 70-77, 93, 96, 102, 113, 114, 131)

 

C.C. Burleigh

 

 

American Freedman’s Inquiry Commission.  Created the U.S. War Department in 1863.  (Fields, 1985; Foner, 1988; Howe, [1864] 1969; McPherson, 1982; Rodriguez, 2007, pp. 67, 165)

 

Samuel Gridley Howe, abolitionist

 

James McKaye, abolitionist

 

Robert Owens, abolitionist

 

 

American Missionary Association (AMA), founded September 3, 1846, disbanded 1890.  Non-sectarian, ecumenical group.  Lobbied Northern churches to support abolitionist cause.  Also promoted anti-slavery in South.  In 1864, placed 250 missionaries in South and border states.  Worked during Reconstruction to aid freed slaves.  Established Fisk University (1866), Nashville, Tennessee; Atlanta University (1865), Georgia; Talladega College (1867), Talladega, Alabama; Straight (now Dillard University; 1869), New Orleans, Louisiana; Tillotson (now Houston-Tillotson College; 1877), Austin, Texas; Le Moyne (now Le Moyne-Owen College; 1870), Memphis, Tennessee; Hampton Institute (1868), Hampton, Virginia; Tougaloo College (1869), Tougallo, Mississippi.  Assisted in founding Howard University (1867), Washington, DC.  (DeBoer, 1994; DeBoer, 1995; Filler, 1960, pp. 197, 222; Mabee, 1970, pp. 4, 193, 235-242, 266, 270, 291, 319, 326, 327, 339, 341, 357, 373; Rodriguez, 2007, pp. 69, 149, 157, 166-176, 172, 420-422; Whipple, 1876)

 

Arthur Tappan, leader, founder  (Harrold, 1995; Mabee, 1970; Rodriguez, 2007, pp. 166-167; Sorin, 1971, pp. 73, 75, 102, 114)

 

Lewis Tappan, leader, founder (Harrold, 1995; Mabee, 1970; Rodriguez, 2007, pp. 166-167; Sorin, 1971, pp. 70-77, 93, 96, 102, 113, 114, 131)

 

George Whipple, leader, corresponding secretary (Harrold, 1995; Mabee, 1970; Rodriguez, 2007, pp. 166-167)

 

Theodore S. White, African American (Rodriguez, 2007; Sorin, 1971, pp. 31-85, 90-92, 97)

 

Samuel Ringold Ward, African American (Mabee, 1970; Rodriguez, 2007; Sorin, 1971, pp. 85-89, 96, 132)

 

James Pennington, African American (Mabee, 1970; Rodriguez, 2007)

 

Charles Bennett Ray, African American (Mabee, 1970; Rodriguez, 2007)

 

Reverend John G. Fee, founded Berea College, Kentucky (Harrold, 1995; Mabee, 1970; Rodriguez, 2007)

 

General Samuel Chapman Armstrong, leader (Rodriguez, 2007)

 

 

American Wesleyan Anti-Slavery Society (Sernett, 2002, p. 82)

 

 

Amesbury and Salisbury, Massachusetts, Female Anti-Slavery Society (Jeffry, 1998, p. 81)

 

 

Anti-Slavery Convention of American Women, 1837-1839 (Dumond, 1961, p. 189; Yellin, 1994, pp. 5, 10-16, 17, 34, 40-41, 51-52, 64, 116-117, 120, 129, 134-135, 160, 168-171, 177, 231, 235, 245-247, 284-287)

 

 

Anti-Slavery Sewing Society (Rodriguez, 2007, p. 233)

 

 

Anti-Slavery Society of Canada

 

 

Ashtabula County (Ohio) Female Anti-Slavery Society (Jeffrey, 1998, pp. 37, 55, 76-78)

 

 

Association of Friends for Advocating the Cause of the Slave and Improving the Condition of Free People of Color, later renamed Association Promoting the Abolition of Slavery, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, founded in May 1837, renamed in 1840.  This group had approximately 100 members who were staunch abolitionists.  This group advocated anti-slavery the Philadelphia Hicksite Society of Friends.  They published newsletters and petitions, and called for an immediate end to slavery, similar to the policy of the American Anti-Slavery Society.  They promoted the idea of the use of free produce, that is, goods produced without the use of slave labor, among Quakers.  (Drake, 1950, pp. 154, 170, 172; Filler, 1960)

 

Caleb Clothier, first president

 

Daniel Miller, Jr., clerk

 

Daniel Neall, Jr.

 

Dillwyn Parrish

 

James Mott

 

Lucretia Mott

 

Emmor Kimber

 

Sarah Hopper Palmer

 

 

Baltimore Society for the Protection of Free People of Color, organized by Baltimore Friends, July 1827, disbanded 1829.  Organized to help “kidnapped” Blacks.  (Drake, 1950, p. 132n48)

 

 

Bangor Female Anti-Slavery Society (Jeffry, 1998, pp. 66, 248n90)

 

 

Bangor Juvenile Anti-Slavery Society (Jeffry, 1998, pp. 85-86)

 

 

Boston Female Anti-Slavery Society (BFASS), formed October 1833 (1832?), disbanded 1840; newsletter, The Liberty Bell.  Associated with the American Anti-Slavery Society and the New England Anti-Slavery Society.  Had African American and White members.  Represented Evangelical Christian, Baptist, Presbyterian, Congregational and liberal denominations, including Quaker and Unitarian.

(Boylan, 1994; Chambers-Schiller, 1994; Dumond, 1961; Hansen, 1993; Rodriguez, 2007, pp. 42, 199, 221, 288; Yellin, 1994, pp. 2, 8, 12-13, 26, 36, 37, 39, 42, 45-65, 120, 159-160, 170-176, 221, 257, 262, 263, 282-283, 285, 287, 289, 307, 316, 333)

 

Anne Chapman, founder (Yellin, 1994)

 

Caroline Weston Chapman, founder (Yellin, 1994, pp. 172, 285)

 

Deborah Chapman, founder (Yellin, 1994)

 

Maria Weston Chapman, founder, editor of The Liberty Bell (Harrold, 1995; Mabee, 1970; Yellin, 1994, pp. 45, 49-50, 53-57, 59-62, 62n, 170, 172-173)

 

Charlotte Phelps, first president (Yellin, 1994, p. 49)

 

Lydia Maria Child, 1802-1880, editor of The Liberty Bell (Harrold, 1995; Karcher, 1994; Mabee, 1970; Meltzer, 1982; Yellin, 1994, pp. 48-49, 60, 62n48-49)

 

Adrianna Adams, African American (Yellin, 1994)

 

Lucy Ball (Yellin, 1994, pp. 45, 56-57, 57n, 61, 64n, 363)

 

Martha Ball (Yellin, 1994, pp. 45, 56-57n, 60-61, 63-64n, 64, 263, 280)

 

C. Barbadoes, African American (Yellin, 1994)

 

Mrs. Jehiel C. Berman, African American (Yellin, 1994)

 

Alice Burley, African American (Yellin, 1994)

 

Alice Bush, African American (Yellin, 1994)

 

Hannah Cutler, African American (Yellin, 1994)

 

Eunice Davis, African American, board member (Yellin, 1994, p. 56)

 

Bathscheba Fowler, African American (Yellin, 1994)

 

Lydia Fuller (Yellin, 1994, p. 61)

 

Mary Gilbert (Yellin, 1994, p. 61)

 

Lydia Gould, African American (Yellin, 1994)

 

Lavinia Hilton, African American (Yellin, 1994)

 

Cecilia Howard, African American (Yellin, 1994)

 

Anna Lawton, African American (Yellin, 1994)

 

Eliza Logan Lawton, African American (Yellin, 1994)

 

Chloe Lee, African American (Yellin, 1994)

 

Mary Lewis (?), African American (Yellin, 1994)

 

Anna Logan, African American (Yellin, 1994)

 

Louisa Loring (Yellin, 1994, pp. 48, 50)

 

Rebecca Louge (Yellin, 1994, p. 62)

 

Lavinia Nell, African American (Yellin, 1994)

 

Louisa Nell, African American (Yellin, 1994)

 

Abigail Ordway (Yellin, 1994, p. 61)

 

Mary S. Parker (Yellin, 1994, pp. 36, 43, 174)

 

Susan Paul, African American (Yellin, 1994, p. 49)

 

Martha Ann Pero, African American (Yellin, 1994)

 

Ann Phillips (Yellin, 1994, p. 50)

 

Nancy Prince, African American (Yellin, 1994)

 

Jane Putnam, African American (Yellin, 1994)

 

Mrs. Rayner (Yellin, 1994, p. 61)

 

Philis Salem, African American (Yellin, 1994)

 

Catherine Sargent (Yellin, 1994, p. 62)

 

Henrietta Sargent (Yellin, 1994, pp. 51, 62, 64, 253n)

 

Adeline Saunders, African American (Yellin, 1994)

 

Margaret Scarlet, African American (Yellin, 1994)

 

Susan Sears (Yellin, 1994, p. 61)

 

Louisa Sewell (Yellin, 1994, p. 50)

 

Judith Shipley (Yellin, 1994, p. 61)

 

Emma Smith (Yellin, 1994, p. 61)

 

Thankful Southwick (Yellin, 1994, pp. 56, 62, 64, 253n, 280, 289, 292)

 

Catherine Sullivan, vice president (Yellin, 1994, pp. 45, 55, 64-65)

 

Hannah Tufts (Yellin, 1994, p. 62)

 

Anne Warren Weston (Yellin, 1994, pp. 172, 285)

 

Caroline Williams, African American (Yellin, 1994)

 

Julia Williams, African American (Yellin, 1994, p. 61)

 

 

Boylston Female Anti-Slavery Society, founded June 1837 (Jeffrey, 1998, pp. 62-63)

 

Mary White, co-founder (Jeffrey, 1998, pp. 62-63)

 

 

Brookline (Connecticut) Female Anti-Slavery Society, founded 1834 (Jeffrey, 1998, pp. 38, 49, 61, 69, 77, 81)

 

 

Canton (Ohio) Ladies’ Anti-Slavery Society (Jeffrey, 1998, pp. 37, 67)

 

 

Caroline County Society (Locke, 1901, p. 99n)

 

 

Cazenovia Ladies Anti-Slavery Society (Sernett, 2002, p. 130)

 

Grace Wilson, member

 

 

Chestertown Society for Promoting the Abolition of Slavery and the Relief of Free Negroes and Others, Unlawfully Held in Bondage, Maryland (Basker, 2005, pp. 224, 241; Locke, 1901, pp. 99n, 100)

 

Joseph Wilkerson (Basker, 2005, pp. 225-226)

 

James Maslin (Basker, 2005, p. 224)

 

Abraham Ridgely (Basker, 2005, pp. 224, 225, 227, 238)

 

 

Choptank Society (Locke, 1901, pp. 99n, 107)

 

 

Cincinnati Anti-Slavery Society, Cincinnati, Ohio, founded 1835 (Rodriguez, 2007, pp. 50, 185)

 

Gamaliel Bailey, 1807-1859, co-founder, secretary (Harrold, 1995; Rodriguez, 2007, pp. 56, 185)

 

 

Clarkson Anti-Slavery Society, Pennsylvania (Drake, 1950, p. 149)

 

Thomas Whitson

 

Linda Coats

 

 

Colored Female Anti-Slavery Society, Middletown, Connecticut, founded 1834 (Yellin, p. xvi)

 

 

Committee for West India Missions, merged with the American Missionary Association (AMA)

 

 

Concord (New Hampshire) Female Anti-Slavery Society (Jeffrey, 1998, p. 89)

 

Mary Clark (Jeffrey, 1998, p. 89)

 

 

“Congregational Friends,” Society of Friends, Quakers.  Temperance, women’s rights, against capital punishment, anti-slavery organization.

 

 

Connecticut Abolition Society (Basker, 2005, pp. 131, 134, 135, 136, 137, 141, 142, 143, 169, 223, 239; Zilversmit, 1967, pp. 201-202)

 

Uriah Tracy (Basker, 2005, pp. 223, 224, 238, 239)

 

 

Connecticut Society for the Promotion of Freedom and for the Relief of Persons Unlawfully Holden in Bondage, see Connecticut Abolition Society (Dumond, 1961, p. 47; Locke, 1901, pp. 99, 103, 103n, 109, 126)

 

 

Conscience Whigs (Blue, 2005, pp. 9, 52, 52n33, 53, 196, 198, 204; Drake, 1950, p. 137; Mitchell, 2007, pp. 20, 22, 32-34, 37, 40-41, 43, 47-49, 54, 61, 67, 72, 136; Rodriguez, 2007, pp. 513-514)

 

 

Convention of Delegates from the Abolition Societies Established in Different Parts of the United States (ACPAS; Geliman, 2006, pp. 154-159, 164-165, 181, 185)

 

 

Convention of the People of Color, founded 1831, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

 

 

Dedham (Massachusetts) Female Anti-Slavery Society (Jeffrey, 1998, p. 86)

 

 

Delaware Abolition Society (Basker, 2005, pp. 224, 240, 318, 319, 327, 349; Locke, 1901, pp. 7n, 94, 99n, 99f, 104n, 105n, 108; Zilversmit, 1967, p. 174)

 

Charles W. Dennison, co-founder, member of the American Anti-Slavery Society, editor of Emancipator (Dumond, 1961, pp. 180, 182, 392n19)

 

Joseph Warner (Basker, 2005, p. 224)

 

Isaac H. Starr (Basker, 2005, p. 224)

 

Robert Coram (Basker, 2005, p. 224)

 

 

Delaware Society for Promoting the Abolition of Slavery and for the Relief and Protection of Free Blacks and People of Color, Unlawfully Held in Bondage or Otherwise, see Delaware Abolition Society (Dumond, 1961, pp. 47, 182; Locke, 1901, pp. 7n, 94, 99n, 99f, 104n, 105n, 108)

 

 

Delaware Society for the Gradual Abolition of Slavery (also known as the Willmington Society). (Basker, 2005, pp. 224, 240)

 

 

District of Columbia Society for the Abolition of Slavery (Locke, 1901, pp. 7n, 163, 177)

 

 

Dorcas Anti-Slavery Society, Troy, Ohio (Jeffrey, 1998, p. 160)

 

 

Dorchester Female Anti-Slavery Society (Jeffrey, 1998, p. 76)

 

 

Erie County Anti-Slavery Society, Erie County, New York, founded October 12, 1835 (Sernett, 2002, p. 42)

 

Amos Phelps, founder, abolitionist agent

 

 

Fall River (Massachusetts) Female Anti-Slavery Society (Yellin, 1994, pp. 188-189)

 

 

Female Anti-Slavery Society (Rodriguez, 2007, pp. 42, 43, 218)

 

 

Female Anti-Slavery Society of Chatham Street Chapel, New York, 1834, first female abolitionist group in New York (Yellin, 1994, pp. 33, 33n6)

 

Mrs. William Green, Jr., first director

 

 

Female Association for Promoting the Manufacture and Use of Free Cotton, Philadelphia (Yellin, 1994, pp. 278-279)

 

 

Female Wesleyan Anti-Slavery Society, New York (Yellin, 1994, p. 136)

 

 

Fitchburg Female Anti-Slavery Society, Fitchburg, Massachusetts, founded 1837 (Jeffrey, 1998, p. 60)

 

 

Francis “Fanny” Wright Societies (Rodriguez, 2007, pp. 522-523)

 

 

Free African Society, founded April 1787, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.  A non-denominational, abolitionist, self-help group for African Americans.  The Free African Society established the African Church of Philadelphia in 1794, affiliated with the Protestant Episcopal Church. (Rodriguez, 2007, pp. 25, 26, 156, 159, 294-295, 559-560)

 

Richard Allen, 1760-1830, co-founder, leader

 

Absalom Jones, 1737-1818, free Black, co-founder, leader

 

William Gray, free Black, co-founder

 

Dorus Ginnings, free Black, co-founder

 

William White, free Black, co-founder

 

Jane Ann Murry, free Black, co-founder

 

Sarah Dougherty, free Black, co-founder

 

 

A Free Labor Society, Delaware, founded c. 1826

 

 

Free Produce Association of Friends of Philadelphia Yearly Meeting, founded 1845, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (later renamed Philadelphia Free Produce Association of Friends). (Drake, 1950, pp. 115, 117, 118, 135, 171-174)

 

Samuel Rhodes, founder, Quaker, abolitionist, editor of the Non-Slaveholder (Drake, 1950, pp. 172-173)

 

Abraham Pennock, Quaker, abolitionist, editor of the Non-Slaveholder (Drake, 1950, pp. 130, 172-173)

 

George W. Taylor, Quaker, abolitionist, editor of the Non-Slaveholder (Drake, 1950, pp. 172-173)

 

William J. Allinson, abolitionist, editor of the Non-Slaveholder (Drake, 1950, pp. 172, 174)

 

Thomas Wistar, abolitionist (Drake, 1950, p. 172)

 

 

Free Produce Association of Green Plain, Ohio (Yellin, 1994, p. 279)

 

 

Free Produce Society of Pennsylvania, founded 1826.  Organized to encourage consumers not to purchase goods produced by slave labor.  (Drake, 1950, pp. 115, 117, 118, 135, 171-174; Yellin, 1994, pp. 161, 163, 192, 276-281, 316)

 

William Rawle, lawyer, president (Drake, 1950, p. 118)

 

James Mott, Quaker, abolitionist (Drake, 1950, pp. 118, 140, 154)

 

Edward P. Atlee, Quaker, abolitionist (Drake, 1950, pp. 118, 140)

 

Dr. Joseph Parrish, Quaker, abolitionist (Drake, 1950, pp. 118, 153)

 

Abraham Pennock, Quaker, abolitionist, editor of the Non-Slaveholder (Drake, 1950, pp. 130, 172-173)

 

Isaac Hopper, Quaker, abolitionist (Drake, 1950, pp. 118, 148, 160, 162, 187)

 

Daniel Neall, Quaker, abolitionist (Drake, 1950, pp. 118, 154, 156)

 

Thomas Shipley, Quaker, abolitionist (Drake, 1950, pp. 118, 130, 140)

 

 

Free Soil Party, founded August 9-10, 1848, in Buffalo, New York.  It included members of the “Conscience Whigs” Party, Democrats and members of the Liberty Party.  The motto was, “Free Soil, Free Speech, Free Labor and Free Men.” (Blue, 2005, pp. 3, 4, 7, 9-13, 35, 54-55, 66, 68-75, 121, 123, 139, 142, 144-145, 146, 170-171, 184, 198-205, 212, 214, 218-219, 236, 245; Dumond, 1961; Filler, 1960, pp. 108, 122, 132, 182, 187, 189, 200, 213, 219, 223, 228, 233, 237, 253; Maybee, 1970, pp. 98, 110, 161, 173, 178, 247, 253, 261, 278, 279, 391n29; Mitchell, 2007, pp. 4, 7, 9, 19, 22, 26, 35, 44-47, 53-56, 60-73; Rodriguez, 2007, pp. 50, 133-136, 173, 225, 297-298, 354, 514, 650-651; Sernett, 2002, pp. 124-127, 152)

 

Salmon P. Chase, co-founder, U.S. Secretary of the Treasury, member of the Liberty Party (Mitchell, 2007)

 

Gamaliel Bailey, co-founder (Harrold, 1995)

 

Charles Francis Adams, vice president, 1848

 

John P. Hale, New Hampshire, president, 1852 (Harrold, 1995; Sorin, 1971, pp. 130, 132)

 

George W. Julian, Indiana, vice president, 1852

 

 

Freedom Association, founded 1845 by free Blacks in New England, created to assist slaves to escape to the North (Rodriguez, 2007, p. 49)

 

 

Freewill Baptist Anti-Slavery Society, New York state, founded in 1841, anti-slavery church (Sernett, 2002, p. 95)

 

 

Friends Anti-Slavery Society, Indiana.  Newspaper: Free Labor Advocate and Anti-Slavery Chronicle, published 1841-1848. (Drake, 1950)

 

 

Friends of Human Progress,” Society of Friends, Quaker organizations.  Opposed to slavery, alcohol, tobacco.  Advocated for women’s rights.  (Drake, 1950, p. 174)

 

 

Geneva Colored Anti-Slavery Society, New York, founded 1836 (Sernett, 2002, p. 64)

 

Horace H. Dawkins, president (Sernett, 2002, p. 64)

 

James W. Duffin, secretary (Sernett, 2002, p. 64)

 

 

Green Plain, Ohio, Meeting on the Fugitive Slave Law, Society of Friends, Quakers, abolition group.  Strongly opposed the Fugitive Slave Law of 1850.  (Drake, 1950, p. 175)

 

 

Hicksite Anti-Slavery Society, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.  Associated with Hicksite Quaker Movement.  Promoted Free Produce policy of persuading consumers away from using goods produced by slave labor.  (Drake, 1950, pp. 134, 140, 154, 179)

 

Caleb Clothier, leader

 

Lucretia Mott, leader

 

 

Holmes Missionary Society, founded 1839.  Merged with the American Missionary Association (AMA).  (DeBoer, 1994; Rodriguez, 2007, p. 166)

 

 

Illinois Anti-Slavery League (Dumond, 1961, p. 92)

 

 

Illinois Anti-Slavery Society (Blue, 2005, pp. 93, 97; Dumond, 1961, p. 189; Rodriguez, 2007, p. 161)

 

 

Indiana Anti-Slavery Friends (Rodriguez, 2007, p. 433)

 

 

Indiana State Anti-Slavery Society, newspaper: The Protectionist (Blue, 2005, p. 161; Drake, 1950, p. 174; Dumond, 1961, p. 189)

 

Arnold Buffum, Society of Friends, Quaker, radical abolitionist, editor, The Protectionist (Blue, 2005; Drake, 1950; Dumond, 1961)

 

 

Indiana Yearly Meeting of Anti-Slavery Friends (Mabee, 1970, pp. 147, 201, 225, 231, 264, 402n18; Rodriguez, 2007, p. 232)

 

 

“Kennett Monthly Meeting in Chester County,” Pennsylvania.  Organized “Pennsylvania Yearly Meeting of Progressive Friends, near Kennett Square, founded 1853.  (Drake, 1950, pp. 171, 175)

 

 

Kent County (Rhode Island) Female Anti-Slavery Society (Van Broekhoven, 2002, pp. I, 83, 92-102, 145, 152-158, 212, 216, 257n20; Yellin, 1994, pp. 182-184n, 187, 190)

 

 

Kentucky Abolition Society (Dumond, 1961, p. 95)

 

 

Kentucky Society for the Gradual Relief of Slavery (Dumond, 1961, p. 199; Rodriguez, 2007, p. 511)

 

 

Kingston Anti-Slavery Society (Van Broekhoven, 2002, pp. 88-90)

 

 

Knights of Liberty, founded 1846, St. Louis, Missouri (Rodriguez, 2007, pp. 50, 59)

 

Reverend Moses Dickson, free Black man, co-founder

 

 

Knox College, Galesburg, Illinois (Filler, 1960, p. 33; Muelder, 1959)

 

Reverend George Washington Gale, founder, abolitionist (Muelder, 1959)

 

 

Ladies’ Anti-Slavery Society of Fall River, Massachusetts, founded 1836 (Rodriguez, 2007, pp. 44, 218)

 

Eliza Buffum Chase, co-founder

 

 

Ladies’ (Cincinnati) Anti-Slavery Circle, Cincinnati, Ohio (Jeffrey, 1998, p. 144)

 

 

Ladies’ (Dover) Anti-Slavery Society, Dover, New Hampshire, founded 1835 (Jeffrey, 1998, p. 105)

 

 

Ladies’ New York Anti-Slavery Society (Yellin, 1994, pp. 26-27)

 

 

Ladies’ New York City Anti-Slavery Society (Jeffrey, 1998, pp. 75, 89, 102, 159; Rodriguez, 2007, p. 362; Yellin, 1994, pp. 32, 34-41, 43, 43n, 120, 134, 136)

 

 

Lane Theological Seminary, Cincinnati, Ohio, many early and prominent American abolitionists entered the movement through Lane (Dumond, 1961, pp. 158-165; Harrold, 1995, pp. 90-91; Mabee, 1970, pp. 31, 152, 154, 155, 156, 160, 192; Rodriguez, 2007, pp. 41, 185, 466, 511; Sorin, 1971, pp. 64-65)

 

Lyman Beecher, president (Dumond, 1961; Mabee, 1970, p. 152; Rodriguez, 2007)

 

Reverend William Allan, 1810-1882 (Dumond, 1961; Mabee, 1970, pp. 107, 109; Rodriguez, 2007)

 

John Watson Alvord, 1807-1880 (Dumond, 1961; Rodriguez, 2007)

 

James G. Birney (Dumond, 1961; Harrold, 1995; Mabee, 1970; Rodriguez, 2007)

 

Philemon Bliss (Dumond, 1961; Rodriguez, 2007)

 

Charles Grandison Finney (Dumond, 1961; Harrold, 1995, pp. 71, 90; Mabee, 1970, pp. 130, 152, 153, 218, 253, 291, 339, 403n28; Rodriguez, 2007)

 

Asa Mahan (Dumond, 1961; Mabee, 1970, pp. 218, 403n25; Rodriguez, 2007)

 

Professor John Morgan (Dumond, 1961; Mabee, 1970, pp. 253, 403n25; Rodriguez, 2007)

 

Marius Robinson, 1806-1876 (Dumond, 1961; Rodriguez, 2007)

 

Henry B. Stanton, 1805-1887 (Dumond, 1961; Mabee, 1970; Rodriguez, 2007)

 

Lewis Tappan (Dumond, 1961; Harrold, 1995; Mabee, 1970; Rodriguez, 2007)

 

Arthur Tappan (Dumond, 1961; Harrold, 1995; Mabee, 1970; Rodriguez, 2007)

 

James A. Thome (Dumond, 1961; Mabee, 1970, p. 272; Rodriguez, 2007)

 

Augustus Wattles, 1807-1883 (Dumond, 1961; Mabee, 1970, pp. 104, 155, 394n31, 403n29; Rodriguez, 2007)

 

Theodore Weld (Dumond, 1961; Harrold, 1995; Mabee, 1970; Rodriguez, 2007)

 

George Whipple (Dumond, 1961; Harrold, 1995, p. 87; Mabee, 1970, pp. 153, 235, 403n25; Rodriguez, 2007)

 

Hiram Wilson (Dumond, 1961; Rodriguez, 2007)

 

 

League of Gileadites, founded January 15, 1851, Springfield, Massachusetts.  Had 44 members, comprised of free Blacks, fugitive slaves and Whites.  Its purpose was to protect fugitive slaves from capture under the Federal Fugitive Slave Act of 1850.  (Rodriguez, 2007, p. 206)

 

John Brown, 1800-1859, founder

 

 

Liberty League, founded 1848 (Blue, 2005, pp. 35, 101, 122, 123; Mitchell, 2007, pp. 22, 35, 36, 44, 46, 67, 245; Rodriguez, 2007, p. 51)

 

Gerrit Smith, New York, president, 1848 (Blue, 2005, pp. 26, 32, 34, 50, 53, 98, 121)

 

Charles E. Foot, Michigan, vice president, 1848

 

Jane Swisshelm (Blue, 2005, pp. 142, 144, 160)

 

 

Liberty Party (succeeded American Anti-Slavery Society), founded November 13, 1839, Warsaw, New York, abolitionist political party, merged with the Free Soil Party in 1848. Newspaper: Liberty Party Paper, published by John Thomas in Syracuse, New York.

(Blue, 2005, pp. ix, 2, 4, 5, 9, 16, 23-35, 49-50, 52, 53, 63, 66, 67, 91, 97-101, 116-118, 144, 163, 214, 218, 236, 265, 267; Dumond, 1961, pp. 285-286, 291, 295-304; Filler, 1960, pp. 145, 152, 155, 176, 178, 181, 213; Harrold, 1995, pp. 10, 41, 55-57, 59, 91, 127, 131, 134-141, 174n10; Mabee, 1970, pp. 40, 56, 72, 227, 228, 246, 247, 252, 387n5; Mitchell, 2007, pp. 4, 6-16, 25-29, 31, 44-48, 50, 51, 53, 54, 56, 74, 71, 98, 139, 167, 188, 196, 212, 215, 216, 225, 245, 254n; Rodriguez, 2007, pp. 46, 48, 50, 57, 132, 185, 189, 298, 514, 522; Sernett, 2002, pp. 105, 112-125; Sorin, 1971, pp. 18, 21, 22, 27, 35, 31n, 38, 47, 60, 70, 77, 80, 106, 126, 130, 133)

 

Alvan Stewart, founder, leader (Blue, 2005, pp. 4-5, 9, 13, 15-36, 49, 50, 63, 68, 92-94, 98-145, 266; Dumond, 1961, pp. 225-226, 293-295, 300; Filler, 1960, pp. 151, 177; Harrold, 1995, pp. 54-55, 93; Mabee, 1970, pp. 4, 39, 40, 41, 246, 293; Mitchell, 2007, pp. 7, 8, 14, 17, 21, 31, 36; Sernett, 2002, pp. 49, 52, 73, 112, 122, 298n73; Sorin, 1971, pp. 25, 32, 33, 47-52, 60, 112, 115)

 

James G. Birney, founder, president (Blue, 2005, pp. 20-21, 25, 30, 32, 48-51, 55, 97-99, 101, 139, 142, 163, 186, 217; Harrold, 1995, pp. 20, 23-24, 27-31, 39-40, 56, 91, 165, 179-180n10; Mabee, 1970, pp. 27, 36, 40, 41, 49, 54, 55, 60, 71, 92, 195, 196, 228, 252, 293, 301, 323, 328, 350, 389n7, 411n5; Mitchell, 2007, pp. 4-5, 7, 8, 13-15, 18, 21-31, 35, 50, 101, 199, 225; Sernett, 2002, pp. 38, 49, 68, 109-112, 114-115, 122, 306-308; Sorin, 1971, pp. 25, 38-47, 51, 52, 65, 70n, 97, 103n, 130)

 

Samuel Ringold Ward, free Black (Mabee, 1970, pp. 128, 135, 136, 294, 307, 400n19; Rodriguez, 2007, pp. 34, 46, 48, 53, 166; Sernett, 2002, pp. 54-55, 62-64, 94, 117, 121, 126, 142, 149, 157-159, 169, 171-172, 316n92; Sorin, 1971, pp. 85-89, 96, 132)

 

Henry Highland Garnet, free Black, nomination committee (Appleton’s, 1888, Vol. II, p. 606; Dictionary of American Biography, Charles Scribner’s Sons, New York, 1936; Dumond, 1961, pp. 329-333; Harrold, 1995, pp. 39, 49, 53, 58-59, 167, 188n39; Mabee, 1970, pp. 59-60, 152, 255, 273, 296, 325, 337, 338; Rodriguez, 2007, pp. 33, 164, 192, 305-306, 329; Sernett, 2002, pp. 22, 67, 70-71, 116-117, 206, 209, 240; Sorin, 1971, pp. 89-92, 97, 113)

 

Gerrit Smith, abolitionist leader (Blue, 2005, pp. 19, 20, 25, 26, 32-36, 50, 53, 54, 68, 101, 102, 105, 112, 132, 170; Harrold, 1995, pp. 7, 23, 36, 58-59, 71, 73, 78, 81, 91, 108, 110-111, 116-119, 121, 145-146; Mabee, 1970, pp. 37, 47, 55, 56, 71, 72, 104, 106, 131, 135, 150, 154, 156, 187, 188, 189, 195, 202, 204, 219, 220, 226, 227, 237, 239, 246, 252, 253, 258, 307, 308, 318, 320, 321, 327, 342, 346; Mitchell, 2007, pp. 5, 8, 13, 16, 22, 29, 31, 112, 117-121, 137, 163, 167, 199, 224-225, 243; Sernett, 2002, pp. 22, 36, 49-55, 122-126, 129-132, 137-138, 143-146, 169, 171, 173-174, 205-206, 208-217, 219-230; Sorin, 1971, pp. 25-38, 47, 49, 52, 66, 95, 96, 102, 113, 126, 130)

 

Salmon P. Chase, U.S. Secretary of the Treasury (Blue, 2005, pp. 30, 34, 99, 100, 121, 122; Mitchell, 2007, pp. 25-32)

 

Francis J. Lemoyne, vice president (Blue, 2005, p. 25)

 

Thomas Morris, vice president, 1843

 

Elizur Wright, abolitionist leader (Blue, 2005, pp. 20, 25, 43, 50; Harrold, 1995, pp. 40, 76, 81, 143; Mabee, 1970, pp. 189, 256, 322, 339, 364)

 

Charles B. Ray, free Black (Blue, 2005, p. 98; Mabee, 1970, pp. 58, 59, 62, 95-96, 111, 134, 146, 181, 338, 339, 415n14; Sernett, 2002, pp. 64, 116, 132, 199, 201)

 

John P. Hale, New Hampshire, U.S. presidential candidate, 1847 (Blue, 2005, pp. 8, 35, 51-54, 74, 100-102, 121, 126, 144, 152, 164, 170, 205; Harrold, 1995, pp. 82, 127, 158; Mabee, 1970, p. 252; Mitchell, 2007, pp. 20, 29, 33-37; Sernett, 2002, p. 124; Sorin, 1971, pp. 130, 132)

 

Leicester King, Ohio, nominee for U.S. vice president, 1847 (Blue, 2005, p. 100; Mitchell, 2007, p. 24; Sernett, 2002, p. 124)

 

Lysander Spooner (Blue, 2005, p. 32)

 

William L. Chaplin (Harrold, 1995, pp. 60, 70-74, 110; Sernett, 2002, pp. 122, 130, 132-133, 310nn3,4; Sorin, 1971, p. 113)

 

William Goodell, Liberty League founder (Blue, 2005, pp. 19, 20, 23, 32, 34, 50, 53, 54, 101; Harrold, 1995, pp. 11-13, 34, 36, 38, 58-59, 104-105, 147-148; Mabee, 1970, pp. 48, 107, 187, 228, 246, 249, 252, 300, 333, 341, 387n11, 388n27; Mitchell, 2007, pp. 1, 7, 22, 29, 31, 35, 46, 63, 64, 71, 72, 162-163, 199, 225; Sernett, 2002, pp. 32, 36, 40-41, 53, 73-74, 93, 97-98, 120-121, 123, 153, 204, 275, 303n62, 341-342n68; Sorin, 1971, pp. 25, 57-62, 113-114, 126, 130)

 

John Greenleaf Whittier (Blue, 2005, pp. 4, 5, 37-40, 49-50, 52, 53, 63, 265, 267; Harrold, 1995, pp. 58, 78, 140;  Mabee, 1970, pp. 2, 4, 9, 11, 12, 13, 18, 21, 22, 26, 29, 30, 35, 36, 48, 51, 65, 194, 211, 291, 309, 326, 329, 359, 368, 373, 378, 405n12, 423n41; Mitchell, 2007, pp. 12, 54, 58, 162, 243)

 

James C. Jackson (Sernett, 2002, p. 122; Sorin, 1971, p. 130)

 

Henry Bradley, gubernatorial candidate (Sernett, 2002, p. 123)

 

Wesley Bailey, editor (Sernett, 2002, p. 123)

 

Elihu Burrit, vice presidential candidate (Mabee, 1970, pp. 4, 195, 202, 203, 236, 257, 327, 329, 334, 340, 343, 363, 365, 366, 369, 372, 278, 420n1; Sernett, 2002, p. 123)

 

Charles C. Foote, vice presidential candidate (Sernett, 2002, p. 123)

 

 

Lynn (Massachusetts) Female Anti-Slavery Society (Jeffrey, 1998, pp. 77, 89; Yellin, 1994, pp. 229-230, 234)

 

 

Maine Anti-Slavery Society (Jeffrey, 1998, pp. 207, 249n91)

 

Watkins Harper (Jeffrey, 1998, pp. 207-208)

 

 

Mansfield Anti-Slavery Society, Massachusetts (Newman, 2002, p. 158)

 

 

Manhattan Abolition Society, founded in Manhattan, New York, by African American women, 1840 (Yellin, 1994, p. xvii)

 

 

Manumission Society of North Carolina (Rodriguez, 2007, pp. 576-577)

 

 

Manumission Society of Tennessee, founded 1814; newspaper Manumission Intelligencer founded 1819 (Dumond, 1961, p. 95; Rodriguez, 2007, pp. 33, 105)

 

Charles Osborne

 

 

Maryland Society for Promoting the Abolition of Slavery and the Relief of Free Negroes and Others Unlawfully Held in Bondage.  Helped rescue hundreds of slaves during the period of 1790-1824.  (Basker, 2005, pp. 224, 225, 240; Drake, 1950, pp. 120, 132; Dumond, 1961, pp. 47-48; Locke, 1901, pp. 99, 99n, 100, 101, 103f, 103n, 108, 109, 109n, 110, 120, 121, 131; Zilversmit, 1967, p. 174)

 

Elisha Tyson, Society of Friends, Quaker, “Acting Committee”

 

Samuel Sterett (Basker, 2005, pp. 90, 103, 224, 225, 227)

 

James Winchester (Basker, 2005, pp. 224, 240)

 

Joseph Townsend (Basker, 2005, pp. 224, 225, 238, 241)

 

Adam Fonerdon (Basker, 2005, pp. 224, 225)

 

Jesse Hollingsworth (Basker, 2005, pp. 224, 225)

 

 

Massachusetts Abolition Society (Dumond, 1961, p. 188; Filler, 1960, p. 135; Yellin, 1994, pp. 54-55, 59, 59n)

 

 

Massachusetts Anti-Slavery Society (Basker, 2005, p. 79; Dumont, 1961, p. 173, 182; Mabee, 1970, pp. 2, 20, 34, 47, 48, 72, 115, 116, 119, 122, 123, 124, 165, 211, 212, 232, 242, 249, 250, 251, 252, 262, 291, 295, 308, 317, 387n11, 415n18, 421n23; Rodriguez, 2007, pp. 32, 36, 45, 47, 183, 208, 364, 401, 436; Yellin, 1994, pp. 50, 54n, 56, 79, 250, 253n, 258, 263, 264, 302, 307)

 

Samuel J. May, general agent (Dumond, 1961, p. 182; Rodriguez, 2007)

 

 

Massachusetts Emancipation Society (Yellin, 1994, pp. 261-263)

 

 

Massachusetts Emigrant Aid Society, see New England Emigrant Aid Company

 

 

Massachusetts Female Emancipation Society, Boston, Massachusetts, founded 1840 (Jeffrey, 1998, pp. 162-163; Rodriguez, 2007, p. 199; Yellin, 1994, pp. 59, 59n, 65n, 194/ Zson, pp. 261-263)

 

 

Methodist Episcopal Church, see also African Methodist Episcopal Church (AMEC)

 

 

Michigan State Anti-Slavery Society (Dumond, 1961, p. 189)

 

 

Dr. David Nelson’s Abolitionist Mission Institute, Quincy, Illinois (Rodriguez, 2007, p. 617)

 

 

New England Anti-Slavery Society (NEASS), founded January 1832, Boston, Massachusetts (Blue, 2005, pp. 21-22, 41; Dumond, 1961, p. 172; Filler, 1960, pp. 22, 61, 66; Newman, 2002; Rodriguez, 2007, pp. 41, 218, 401; Salitan, 1994; Stevens, 2003; Van Broekhoven, 2002, pp. 18, 31, 58, 62)

 

William Lloyd Garrison, co-founder (Blue, 2005; Dumond, 1961; Filler, 1960; Harrold, 1995; Mitchell, 2007; Newman, 2002; Sorin, 1971)

 

Arnold Buffum, co-founder, vice president, agent (Newman, 2002, pp. 125, 141, 154-157)

 

Elizabeth Buffum Chase, 1806-1899 (Rodriguez, 2007, p. 218; Salitan, 1994; Stevens, 2003)

 

David Lee Child (Newman, 2002, p. 154)

 

 

New England Emigrant Aid Company, founded 1855 (formerly Massachusetts Emigrant Aid Society, founded 1854).  (Filler, 1960, p. 237; Harrold, 1995, pp. 112, 118, 125, 204n24; Rodriguez, 2007, pp. 56, 58, 201-202, 337)

 

Eli Thayer, founder, leader, Worcester, Massachusetts, established “Free Soil” anti-slavery communities in Kansas (Harrold, 1995)

 

 

New England Yearly Meeting (Orthodox), Society of Friends, Quakers (Drake, 1950, pp. 184, 189n, 196)

 

 

New Hampshire State Anti-Slavery Society (Dumond, 1961, p. 189)

 

 

New Jersey Anti-Slavery Society (Zilversmit, 1967, p. 217)

 

 

New Jersey Society for Promoting the Abolition of Slavery, founded 1792 (Basker, 2005, pp. 223, 239; Dumond, 1961, p. 48; Locke, 1901, pp. 86, 99, 104n, 107-109, 124; Rodriguez, 2007, p. 27; Zilversmit, 1967, pp. 173-174, 184-185, 192-193, 215)

 

Joseph Bloomfield (Basker, 2005, pp. 223-225, 239)

 

William Coxe, Jr. (Basker, 2005, pp. 223-224, 227, 238)

 

John Wistar  (Basker, 2005, pp. 223-224, 227, 238)

 

Robert Pearson  (Basker, 2005, pp. 223-224)

 

Franklin Davenport  (Basker, 2005, pp. 223, 239)

 

 

New York Association of Friends for the Relief of Those Held in Slavery, founded Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1839.  Affiliated with the Society of Friends, Quakers. (Drake, 1950)

 

 

New York City Anti-Slavery Society, founded 1833, New York, New York. (Dumond, 1961, p. 189; Filler, 1960, pp. 63, 136; Rodriguez, 2007, pp. 42, 363, 522; Sorin, 1971)

 

Joshua Leavitt, co-founder

 

 

New York Manumission Society (NYMS), see New York Society for Promoting the Manumission of Slaves (Basker, 2005; Bruns, 1977, pp. 397, 504; Gellman, 2006, pp. 56-61, 64-77, 135, 145, 154-164, 172, 180, 194, 214)

 

 

New York Orthodox Meeting, Society of Friends.  Lobbied U.S. House of Representatives and Senate to end slavery.  (Drake, 1950, p. 189)

 

 

New York Society for Promoting the Manumission of Slaves, New York. (Basker, 2005, pp. 218, 223, 239, 295, 322; Dumond, 1961, p. 47; Locke, 1901, pp. 99, 99n, 101, 103, 104, 104n, 105n, 107, 108, 109, 123; Zilversmit, 1967, pp. 147, 150-151, 160, 162-166, 169, 173-174, 176, 179-180, 208-210, 212)

 

Peter Jay Munro (Basker, 2005, pp. 223, 239)

 

Moses Rogers (Basker, 2005, p. 223)

 

Thomas Franklin, Jr. (Basker, 2005, pp. 223, 224)

 

William Dunlap (Basker, 2005, pp. 223-225, 227, 238)

 

 

New York State Anti-Slavery Society (NYSASS), headquartered in Utica, New York, founded Fall 1835, newspaper: Friend of Man.  (Blue, 2005, pp. 4, 18, 19-20, 23-25, 31; Dumond, 1961, p. 189; Mabee, 1970, pp. 48, 55, 146, 187; Sernett, 2002, pp. 41, 52-53, 73-75; Sorin, 1971, pp. 19, 21, 22, 27, 50, 59-60, 74, 87)

 

Alvan Stewart, founder (Blue, 2005, pp. 4-5, 9, 13, 15-36, 43, 49, 50, 63, 98, 145, 265-267; Harrold, 1995; Sernett, 2002, p. 52; Sorin, 1971, pp. 25, 32, 60, 96, 103n, 132)

 

William Jay, president (Blue, 2005, p. 21; Harrold, 1995; Sernett, 2002, p. 52; Sorin, 1971, pp. 51, 77-81, 96, 132)

 

William Goodell (Blue, 2005, p. 20; Harrold, 1995; Sorin, 1971, pp. 25, 57-62, 126, 130)

Myron Holley (Blue, 2005, p. 23; Sorin, 1971, pp. 47n)

 

Gerrit Smith (Harrold, 1995; Sernett, 2002, p. 25; Sorin, 1971, pp. 25-38, 47, 49, 52, 66, 95, 96, 102, 113-115, 126, 130-131)

 

Beriah Green, corresponding secretary (Harrold, 1995; Sernett, 2002, p. 52; Sorin, 1971, pp. 25, 52-57, 60, 90, 91, 97, 126, 130)

 

Spencer Kellogg, treasurer, Utica, NY (Sernett, 2002, p. 52; Sorin, 1971, pp. 103n)

 

Stanley Hough, editor, Friend of Man, after 1839 (Sernett, 2002, p. 53)

 

Luther Lee, Methodist clergyman, Utica, New York, lecturer for New York Anti-Slavery Society (NYASS; Harrold, 1995; Sernett, 2002, pp. 57-58)

 

 

New York Vigilance Committee

 

 

Newport Anti-Slavery Society, Newport, Rhode Island (Van Broekhoven, 2002, pp. 90, 208, 213)

 

 

Newport Young Ladies’ Juvenal Anti-Slavery Society (Jeffrey, 1998, p. 248n90)

 

 

North Carolina Manumission Society (Filler, 1960, p. 273; Locke, 1901, p. 7n)

 

 

Oberlin College, Ohio, founded 1833, leading abolitionist institution in the United States (Blue, 2005, pp. 6, 66-67, 75, 79-84, 86, 226; Dumond, 1961, pp. 164-165; Filler, 1960, pp. 35, 69, 223; Fletcher, 1943; Mabee, 1970, pp. 3, 77, 104, 153, 154, 156, 157, 200, 212, 218, 219, 235, 238, 253, 394n4, 402n18, 403n25; Rodriguez, 2007, pp. 41-42, 61-62, 208, 244, 465, 488-489, 511; Sorin, 1971, pp. 43, 75, 114)

 

George Whipple, professor of mathematics, principal of preparatory department

 

James A Thome, professor of rhetoric and belles-lettres

 

Asa Mahon, president

 

 

Ohio State Anti-Slavery Society, Cleveland, Ohio (Blue, 2005, pp. 70, 75, 76, 78, 85-87; Dumond, 1961, p. 189; Rodriguez, 2007, pp. 44, 45, 161, 185)

 

Charles Langston, founder (Blue, 2005, pp. 5-6, 65-89, 120, 127, 265-270)

 

Gideon Langston (Blue, 2005, pp. 65-67)

 

John Mercer Langston (Blue, 2005, pp. 5-6, 65-66, 69, 72-76, 78, 79, 81, 85-88)

 

Gamaliel Bailey, MD, 1807-1859, corresponding secretary

 

 

Oneida County Anti-Slavery Association, Oneida County, New York, founded April 1835 (Sernett, 2002, p. 40)

 

Charles Stuart, founder, abolitionist (Sernett, 2002, p. 40)

 

 

Oneida Institute, New York, founded as Oneida Academy, May 1827, in Village of Whitesboro (Blue, 2005, pp. 17, 34-35; Mabee, 1970, pp. 3, 21, 59, 209, 151, 155, 227, 256, 363, 394n22, 395n40, 402n18; Sernett, 2002, pp. 28-32, 33, 37, 53, 88; Sorin, 1971, pp. 54, 86, 90)

 

Theodore Dwight Weld, founder (Sernett, 2002)

 

Reverend George Washington Gale, founder (Sernett, 2002)

 

Charles G. Finney, founder (Sernett, 2002)

 

Reverend Beriah Green, leader  (Sernett, 2002)

 

Henry B. Stanton, student  (Sernett, 2002)

 

John Frost, trustee, pastor, First Presbyterian Church of Whitesboro  (Sernett, 2002)

 

 

Orthodox Philadelphia Meeting for Suffering, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Society of Friends, Quaker.  Abolitionist Quaker group lobbied Congress to abolish slavery and nullify the Fugitive Slave Laws in Pennsylvania.  (Drake, 1950)

 

Enoch Lewis, Society of Friends, Quaker, chairman

 

 

Palmyra Anti-Slavery Society, Palmyra, New York (Sernett, 2002, p. 41)

 

 

Pawtucket Juvenile Emancipation Society, Pawtucket, Rhode Island (Van Broekhoven, 2002, pp. 102-105)

 

 

Pawtucket Ladies Anti-Slavery Society, Pawtucket, Rhode Island (Van Broekhoven, 2002, pp. 102-105)

 

 

Pawtucket Anti-Slavery Society, Pawtucket, Rhode Island (Van Broekhoven, 2002, pp. 102-105)

 

 

Pennsylvania Abolition Society (PAS) (Bruns, 1977, pp. 385, 512-524; Gellman, 2006, pp. 45, 56, 57, 83, 96), see also Society for the Relief of Free Negroes Unlawfully Held in Bondage

 

 

Pennsylvania Anti-Slavery Society (Blue, 2005, p. 45; Mabee, 1970, pp. 48, 106, 196, 202, 265, 275, 289, 299, 303, 305, 325, 342, 350, 410n41; Rodriguez, 2007, pp. 204, 388, 464)

 

 

Pennsylvania Colonization Society

 

Elliot Cresson, Secretary of the Board of Directors

 

Robert Vaux

 

 

The Pennsylvania Free Produce Association, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, founded 1827.  Organized by Society of Friends, Quakers, to encourage Quakers and others to refrain from purchasing goods produced by slave labor.

 

 

Pennsylvania Society for Promoting the Abolition of Slavery, and the Relief of Free Negroes Unlawfully Held in Bondage, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, founded 1789.  Quaker abolitionist organization whose leaders were almost all Hicksites.  They promoted a moderate approach to ending slavery in the United States.  By the late 1830s, it supported education for Black children, hiring lawyers to prevent or thwart kidnapping by slave catchers, and to aid fugitive Blacks in the court system.

(Dumond, 1961, pp. 46-47; Locke, 1901, pp. 91, 93, 94, 97, 98, 98n, 99, 100, 107-111, 127, 127f, 133, 141; Rodriguez, 2007, pp. 25-26, 27; Yellin, 1994, p. 203; Zilversmit, 1967, pp. 159, 162-165, 173-174, 204-206, 207, 224)

 

Dr. Benjamin Rush (Locke, 1901)

 

 

Pennsylvania State Anti-Slavery Society (Basker, 2005, pp. 78-103, 105, 108, 131, 133, 217-218, 223, 225, 239, 247, 248, 299, 316; Dumond, 1961, p. 189; Yellin, 1994, pp. 71, 76, 79, 79n, 81-84, 175, 307, 326, 330)

 

William Rogers (Basker, 2005, pp. 223, 224, 227, 232, 239; Locke, 1901, pp. 91, 168)

 

William Rawle (Basker, 2005, pp. 92, 102, 223-225, 227, 239; Locke, 1901, pp. 92, 127)

 

Samuel Powell Griffitts (Basker, 2005, pp. 223, 224, 227, 238-240)

 

Robert Patterson (Basker, 2005, pp. 223, 224, 238, 240)

 

Samuel Coates (Basker, 2005, pp. 223, 224, 238, 240)

 

Benjamin Rush (Basker, 2005, pp. 33, 80, 81, 92, 101, 217, 223, 228, 240, 308, 316; Locke, 1901, pp. 48, 52, 54-56, 58-59, 62, 93, 189)

 

James Miller McKim (Yellin, 1994 pp. 76, 161-162, 162n, 168, 287)

 

 

Philadelphia Female Anti-Slavery Society (PFASS) (Rodriguez, 2007, pp. 321, 387, 388, 416; Yellin, 1994, pp. 26, 67-88, 73-74, 92, 97, 105, 175n, 176, 237-238, 285, 307)

 

Maria Davis Mott, Quaker (Yellin, 1994)

 

Anna Hopper Mott, Quaker (Yellin, 1994)

 

Lucretia Mott, Quaker (Yellin, 1994)

 

Ester Moore (Yellin, 1994)

 

Lydia White (Yellin, 1994)

 

Mary Grew (Yellin, 1994)

 

Susan Grew (Yellin, 1994)

 

Grace Douglass, charter member (Yellin, 1994)

 

Margaretta Forten, charter member, recording secretary, treasurer (Yellin, 1994)

 

Sarah Louisa Forten, charter member (Yellin, 1994)

 

Harriet D. Forten Purvis, charter member (Yellin, 1994)

 

Hulduh Justice, vice president, charter member (Yellin, 1994)

 

Sarah J. McKim (Yellin, 1994)

 

Gertrude Burleigh (Yellin, 1994)

 

Emily Winslow (Yellin, 1994)

 

Paulina Wright (Yellin, 1994)

 

Rebecca Plumly (Yellin, 1994)

 

Susan Parrish (Yellin, 1994)

 

Mary Needles (Yellin, 1994)

 

Anna Hopper (Yellin, 1994)

 

Sarah Pugh, president (Yellin, 1994)

 

Maria Hopper (Yellin, 1994)

 

Amy Matilda Cassey (Yellin, 1994)

 

Rebecca Buffum (Yellin, 1994)

 

Sarah Douglas (Yellin, 1994)

 

Sarah Lewis (Yellin, 1994)

 

Mary Earle (Yellin, 1994)

 

Phoebe Earle (Yellin, 1994)

 

Mary C. Pennock (Yellin, 1994)

 

Elizabeth Neall, executive committee (Yellin, 1994)

 

 

Philadelphia Vigilance Committee, part of the Pennsylvania Anti-Slavery Society (Rodriguez, 2007, pp. 204, 307, 464, 489, 654)

 

William Still, free Black

 

Thomas Garrett, 1789-1877, abolitionist leader

 

 

Portage Female Anti-Slavery Society, Ohio (Jeffrey, 1998, p. 69)

 

Lucy Wright (Jeffrey, 1998, pp. 69-70)

 

 

Providence Abolition Society (Van Broekhoven, 2002, pp. 2-3, 17-18, 145)

 

 

Providence (Rhode Island) Female Anti-Slavery Society (Yellin, 1994, pp. 182, 187, 187n, 190n; Van Broekhoven, 2002, pp. 17-18, 25, 52, 212)

 

 

Providence Ladies Anti-Slavery Society

 

 

Providence Society for the Abolition of Slavery (Providence Anti-Slavery Society). (Drake, 1950; Dumond, 1961, p. 188; Locke, 1901, p. 13; Rodriguez, 2007, p. 26; Van Broekhoven, 2002, pp. 17-18)

 

 

Quakers, see Society of Friends

 

 

Rhode Island Anti-Slavery Society, founded February 2-4, 1836, in Providence, Rhode Island. (Dumond, 1961, p. 188; Van Broekhoven, 2002, pp. 4-5, 8, 18, 125)

 

Henry B. Stanton, founder

 

Ray Potter, Pawtucket, Rhode Island, Baptist minister, co-founder, “Friend of Man,” October 13, 1836 (Dumond, 1961, p. 182; Friend of Man newspaper, October 13, 1836)

 

 

Rhode Island Society for the Gradual Abolition of Slavery (Rodriguez 2007, p. 218)

 

 

Rhode Island State Anti-Slavery Society (Dumond, 1961, p. 188)

 

 

Rochester (New York) Female Anti-Slavery Society (RFASS), Rochester, New York (Yellin, 1994, pp. 26-28)

 

Susan Farley Porter, president

 

Elizabeth Atkinson, wife of Finney

 

Mrs. Elon Galusha

 

 

Rochester (New York) Ladies’ Anti-Slavery Society (RLASS), all-woman, all-White group founded to support the work of Black abolitionist Frederick Douglass (Sernett, 2002, pp. 58-60; Yellin 1994, pp. 28-30)

 

Susan Farley Porter, president (Sernett, 2002, p. 58)

 

 

Salem Anti-Slavery Society (Rodriguez, 2007, p. 288)

 

 

Sherburne Ladies’ Anti-Slavery Society, Chenango County, New York, founded March 1835 (Sernett, 2002, p. 42)

 

 

Smithfield Anti-Slavery Society, Munnsville, New York, founded 1834 (Sernett, 2002, p. 41)

 

 

Smithfield Society, Peterboro, New York, founded April 1834 (Sernett, 2002, pp. 32-34)

 

 

Society for the Abolition of Slave Trade (Rodriguez, 2007, p. 178)

 

 

Society for the Relief of Free Negroes Unlawfully Held in Bondage (Bruns, 1977, pp. 384-385, 510; Rodriguez, 2007, pp. 18, 21, 455-456), see also Pennsylvania Abolition Society

 

 

Society of Friends, Quakers.  Here is a quote by a famous Quaker, U.S. Congressman Thomas Forrest: “Would to God we were all Quakers, in order that there might be less oppression, evil, and bloodshed in the land.”

(Basker, 2005, pp. 1-7, 15, 22, 31-33, 53-57, 68-70, 76, 79-84, 105, 107-109, 114-115, 120, 122-125, 131, 132, 170, 175, 179-181, 217-218, 239, 240, 241, 291, 295, 299, 316; Bruns, 1977, pp. 3, 10, 57, 58, 68, 125, 308, 446, 493; Drake, 1950; Filler, 1960, pp. 13, 19, 49, 66, 122, 123, 163; Hammond, 2011, pp. 19, 20, 34, 36, 50, 51, 53, 60, 64, 78; Mabee, 1970, pp. 1-3, 8, 9, 18, 20, 72, 73, 76, 204, 224, 225, 226, 230, 374-378; Zilversmit, 1967, pp. 25, 55-58, 61-83, 90-92, 101, 108, 124-125, 131, 138, 140, 147, 152, 157-158, 166-167, 178, 186, 203, 205)

 

Edward P. Atlee, Quaker, abolitionist

 

Elisha Bates, Mount Pleasant, newspaper publisher

 

Anthony Benezet

 

William Bradford, 1658-1752 (Soderlund, 1985, p. 194)

 

William Burling, b. 1678

 

Elizabeth Chandler, poet, 1807-1834

 

Elizabeth Buffam Chase, 1806-1899

 

Caleb Clothier, Philadelphia

 

Lindley Coats, 1794-1856

 

Samuel Coats, 1748-1830, Philadelphia

 

Addison Coffin, Indiana

 

Alfred Coffin, Indiana

 

Levi Coffin, 1798-1877, Indiana

 

Vestal Coffin

 

Elihu Coleman, d. 1789

 

Isaac Collins, 1746-1817

 

David Cooper, New Jersey

 

Elliot Cresson, 1796-1854, Philadelphia

 

Paul Cuffee (Cuffe), 1759-1818, free Black, sea captain, author, A Brief Account of the Settlement and Present Situation of the Colony of Sierra Leone, 1812

 

William Dillwyn, New Jersey

 

Thomas Earle, 1796-1848, Mississippi

 

William Edmunson, Pennsylvania

 

John Farmer (Soderlund, 1985, pp. 22, 35, 149)

 

James Canning Fuller

 

Bartholomew Fussell, Pennsylvania

 

James Sloan Gibbons, b. 1810

 

Henry Grew

 

Angelina Emily Grimké (Soderlund, 1985, p. 13)

 

Sarah Moore Grimké, 1792-1873 (Soderlund, 1985, p. 13)

 

Laura Haviland, New York

 

Thomas Hazzard, Rhode Island

 

John Hepburn

 

Elias Hicks, 1748-1830

 

Isaac Tattem Hopper, Quaker, abolitionist

 

Emily Howland, 1827-1829

 

Jeremiah Hubbard

 

Richard Humphreys, Philadelphia

 

George Washington Julian, 1817-1899

 

George Keith, c. 1639-1716 (Soderlund, 1985, pp. 18-19, 22)

 

Abby (Foster) Kelley, 1811-1887

 

Emmor Kimber, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

 

Benjamin Ladd, Smithfield, Ohio

 

Benjamin Lay (Drake, 1950; Nash, 1991; Rodrigues, 2007; Soderlund, 1985; Zilversmit, 1967)

 

Isaac Leggett

 

Dr. John Coakley Lettsom, physician, London, England

 

Enoch Lewis, publisher, African Observer

 

Evan Lewis, Wilmington, American Anti-Slavery Society

 

Benjamin Lundy, 1789-1839, philanthropist, American Anti-Slavery Society, organized Union Humane Society, St. Clairsville, Ohio, in 1815, New Jersey newspaper publisher, Genius of Universal Emancipation

 

Charles Marriot

 

Warner Mifflin, 1745-1798

 

 

Daniel Miller

 

James Mott, Quaker, abolitionist

 

Lucretia Coffin Mott, 1793-1880, Philadelphia

 

John Murray, Jr., New York

 

Daniel Neal, Quaker, abolitionist

 

Daniel Neal, Jr.

 

Edward Needles, Pennsylvania

 

William Newbold, Trenton, New Jersey

 

Charles Osborn, farmer, publisher, The Philanthropist

 

Dillwyn Parrish, Pennsylvania

 

John Parrish, 1829-1807

 

Joseph Parrish, Quaker, abolitionist

 

James Pemberton, 1723-1808, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (Soderlund, 1985, pp. 44, 140, 151, 166, 170, 171, 191)

 

John Pemberton, 1727-1795, Delaware (Soderlund, 1985, pp. 29, 30n, 44, 140, 150, 166, 170, 171, 190)

 

Abraham Pennock, Philadelphia

 

Robert Pleasants, Richmond, Virgina

 

Amy Kirby Post, 1802-1889, Rochester, New York

 

Isaac Post, 1798-1872, Rochester, New York

 

Robert Pyle

 

Samuel Rhoades, Philadelphia

 

Timothy Rogers, Ferrisberg, Vermont

 

William Rotch, Nantucket

 

Ralph Sandiford (Soderlund, 1985, pp. 23, 25, 35, 166-167, 174, 186)

 

Joseph Sansom, poet

 

Thomas Shipley, American Anti-Slavery Society, Philadelphia

 

William A. Southeby (Soderlund, 1985, pp. 4, 19, 22, 32, 35, 149, 186, 187)

 

Edwin Thompson, 1809-1888

 

William Thornton, from West Indian island of Tortola, helped found American Colonization Society

 

Elisha Tyson, Baltimore, Maryland, Acting Committee, Maryland Abolition Society

 

Henry H. Way, Indiana

 

Refine Weeks, poet, New York

 

Lydia White

 

John Greenleaf Whittier, 1807-1892, American Anti-Slavery Society, poet

 

Thomas Wittson

 

Samuel Wood, publisher, New York

 

John Woolman, 1720-1772, New Jersey (Soderlund, 1985)

 

 

South Scituate Anti-Slavery Society, Plymouth County (Newman, 2002, pp. 158-159, 218n50)

 

 

Tennessee Society for Promoting the Manumission of Slaves, Jefferson County, Tennessee. (Dumond, 1961, p. 136; Rodriguez, 2007, p. 37)

 

Elihu Embree, iron manufacturer, publisher, Jonesboro

 

Charles Osborne, farmer, publisher of The Philanthropist (in Ohio) in 1817

 

 

Union (New York) Anti-Slavery Sewing Society (Yellin, 1994, p. 28)

 

 

Union Humane Society, founded 1815. (Dumond, 1961, p. 136; Rodriguez, 2007, pp. 33, 105, 489-490)

 

Benjamin Lundy

 

 

Union Missionary Society, merged with American Missionary Society

 

 

Unitarian Church (Mabee, 1970, pp. 8, 15, 16, 21, 71, 82, 208, 234, 255, 409n11)

 

Reverend Ellery Channing, leader

 

 

Utica Anti-Slavery Society, Utica, New York (Sernett, 2002, p. 40)

 

 

Vermont State Anti-Slavery Society (Dumond, 1961, p. 188; Rodriguez, 2007, p. 39)

 

 

Virginia Abolition Society (Virginia Society for Promoting the Abolition of Slavery; Basker, 2005, pp. 225-226, 241; Locke, 1901, pp. 99, 99n, 105, 107; Rodriguez, 2007, p. 27)

 

 

Washington Abolition Society, Pennsylvania (Basker, 2005, pp. 225, 241)

 

 

Western Evangelical Missionary Society, merged with the American Missionary Association (AMA)

 

 

Western New York Anti-Slavery Society (WNYASS), Rochester, New York, founded 1842, mixed sex membership, active in Underground Railroad, worked closely with Frederick Douglass (Sernett, 2002, pp. 58-62, 159; Yellin, 1994, pp. 27-30, 150)

 

Abby Kelley, organizer (Sernett, 2002, pp. 74, 99)

 

Isaac Post, founder, Hicksite Quaker, husband of Amy Post (Sernett, 2002, pp. 60, 180-181, 266, 340n)

 

Amy Post, 1802-1889, executive committee, Hicksite Quaker, wife of Isaac Post (Sernett, 2002, pp. xiv, 60, 61, 181, 340n50)

 

Sarah Fish, executive committee

 

Samuel Porter (Sernett, 2002)

 

 

Western Reserve College, Hudson, Ohio (Filler, 1960, pp. 103, 202, 224; Sernett, 2002, p. 29; Sorin, 1971, pp. 53, 54, 57)

 

 

Western Reserve Free Soilers, Ohio (Mitchell, 2007, pp. 1, 6-7, 14, 23, 25-26, 60, 65, 69, 70, 71, 143, 246)

 

 

Whitestown (Oneida County, New York) Society, abolition group had one hundred members in April 1834 (Sernett, 2002, pp. 32-33)

 

 

Wilmington Society, see Delaware Society for the Gradual Abolition of Slavery

 

 

Wilmot Proviso Democrats

 

 

Women’s Anti-Slavery Society of Ellington, Chautauqua County, New York (Sernett, 2002, p. 62)

 

 

Women’s National Loyal League, founded 1863.  Lobbied to have Thirteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution to grant African Americans the right to vote.  Collected 400,000 signatures in a petition presented to the Congress.

 

Susan B. Anthony, co-founder (Sernett, 2002, pp. 204-205, 213, 217-218, 227, 270)

 

Elizabeth Cady Stanton, co-founder (Sernett, 2002, pp. 17, 43-44, 62, 145-146, 270)

 

 

World Anti-Slavery Conventions, 1840, 184?

 

Jonathan Blanchard, 1811-1892, vice president (1843)